Alternator pulley sheared off!

A2Z

Member
Thanks for the info guys and link.

I have no G65 fault code which is a good thing so will see if I can spin the compressor pulley and if not just get it regassed and see πŸ€žπŸ‘
 

A2Z

Member
I have just tested the pulley on my AC compressor and it is spinning freely by hand.

I guess this means the compressor is bad so my next question would be are they all the same on all models of A2?

Also is it easier to remove and replace from above or below, as if it's only do-able from above it will mean the alternator coming off as well as the belt and tensioner, all of which I'm just about to fit where as if I can do it from below the alternator can stay and so I might as well fit it now and get the car back on the road, otherwise I might be as well waiting until I get a new AC compressor too πŸ€”
 

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2work

A2OC Donor
When I removed mine last year (1.4 petrol BBY) I don’t it all from beneath. Car on axel stands and undone the 2 (or 3, can’t remember now) long bolts and it came out easily. Of course you will need to remove the belt and the 2 pipes with the R134a inside. I’m sure there is a health and safety video you should read first, but if it already has no pressure you might be fine. Have a read up regards the gas and safe removal.

I got a new Denso compressor from ECP at quite a good price compared to other online car part suppliers.

Kind regards,

Tom
 
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spike

Well-Known Member
I've not seen a failed aircon coupling but I assume the compressor shaft would be seized so the outer pulley rotates while the shaft is stationary.
I just had this vision of you being able to rotate the pulley with a bit of resistance and assuming it had failed.
If the shaft turns with the pulley it may still be serviceable so worth checking further before scrapping it

Apologies for a statement of the obvious

Cheers Spike
 

A2Z

Member
I've not seen a failed aircon coupling but I assume the compressor shaft would be seized so the outer pulley rotates while the shaft is stationary.
I just had this vision of you being able to rotate the pulley with a bit of resistance and assuming it had failed.
If the shaft turns with the pulley it may still be serviceable so worth checking further before scrapping it

Apologies for a statement of the obvious

Cheers Spike
No need for any apologies Spike and I welcome any advice and really appreciate your time in trying to help.

I too have never had any experience with a failed air con compressor, as I hadn't with a failed alternator pulley until this week. I put that down to good fortune and like I say to my children, we all start out in life knowing nothing and only know how to do things by learning and through experience.

I've never been one to be ignorant to other people's opinions in fact quite the opposite, I'm always very keen to listen to someone elses advice or way of doing things. Whether I do it that way is another matter. I'm a perfectionist and always try to do everything the best way it can be done so advice from someone who knows or has learnt from having done it themselves is always welcome and more usual than not beneficial in some way.

Regarding the pulley, it spins quite freely without any real resistance but I don't really know if it's bad or not and I only think it could be through having read what someone had said previously.

I will try to look into it a little more before I tackle it I think as I certainly wouldn't want to replace my compressor if there is nothing wrong with it, even if after nearly 17 years it isn't quite as shiny as my nice new alternator 😁
 

audifan

A2OC Donor
I think this may be better on its own thread as any one else looking for alternator information are now seeimg solely air con compressor talk.
 
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Rusty911

A2OC Donor
Lots of references on that interweb on testing your AC compressor.

If it's not been serviced for a long time (and assuming the AC compressor seems to check out O.K.), it's well worth getting a 'proper' re-gas done. I use the DIY cylinders but frankly they're only good for an interim top-up.

The full pro machine applies a vacuum over a period (roughly 1/4 hour). This helps pull out the old gas, oils and any UV dye. It cleans your existing gas (if any) measures out the precise amount of gas, oil and if required, UV dye needed for your car. It'll put your recycled gas back in and then top up from its own tank (or external cylinder) to reach the required weight of gas needed.

The DIY cartridges are virtually the price of a pro-regas, offer no diagnostic function, don't remove the acid that may have built up in the system and other than pressure, have no way of telling what was either required by, or actually added to your system. Also, oil is added by virtue of shaking the can: not hugely precise.

Out of interest, a lot of places (like Kwikfit) offer a 'no-charge' deal if your system won't hold a vacuum, so you don't have much to lose.

I tend to get a full recharge done on my long termers, and then measure the system pressure with my DIY gauge. After a year or two I might put a puff in myself, but the next time would be another professional recharge. They always seem to be much colder.

I would be reluctant to use the DIY system for a full, start with almost nothing, re-charge tbh.
 
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A2Z

Member
All back together and good as new again, well in that department anyway 😁

Although it cost me a lot more than it had to to get back on the road, I decided to go the whole hog and replace the alternator, tensioner and auxiliary belt and do the complete job and I'm glad I did, not only for peace of mind for the future but it's all sounding sweet and looking rather nice too!

If any of you do tackle the job yourself though, be very careful when removing the pin that locks the tensioner in the open 'fitting' position as mine didn't want to come out and when it did, the force of the spring doesn't give you much chance or room to get the ring spanner that you have to use out of the way and it would be very easy to get your hand or wrist trapped or possibly even broken. This was bar far the worst bit of the job and there isn't room to get a socket on it so is the only way.

Really pleased the job's done now though and everything is torqued up to the correct settings thanks to @Sarge for the thread I found of his posting these figures πŸ‘
 

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A2Z

Member
Well done.
How did you get on with the A/C compressor

Cheers Spike
Thanks Spike,

Yes it is a nice sense of accomplishment when you do a job yourself and know that everything has been done right.

My only problem is these days I find I'm doing everything myself as I don't really trust that if I pay someone else to do it that the job will be right and on the odd occasion I have, I've ended up doing it again myself anyway. A bit sad I know but the way I feel.

The obvious issue with that is time, as although I do it right when it's not what you do day in day out it obviously takes longer than for someone who does do a job everyday.

Regarding the AC compressor I just didn't have the 'time' to do anything about it and needed to get the car back on the road but I have decided to have it regassed first anyway, professionally by someone I've been recommended and see the results of that, a bit contradictory of what I've just said I know but🀞it might sort it and be all that is needed as everything else heater/temperature wise is working fine hot and cold so we'll see πŸ‘
 

Howey

Member
A quick test to see if you a regas will sort inop ac is to unscrew one of black port caps and activate the valve with a blunt instrument (lolly pop stick works great)
If you have pressure a fast jet of gas will be expelled and the system should work great again with a service/re-gas, if not then nothing will happen and your issue is greater than a service. make sure to keep body/skin out of harms way of escaping gas and be very quick as it will be clear if the system is pressurised
 
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Rusty911

A2OC Donor
A quick test to see if you a regas will sort inop ac is to unscrew one of black port caps and activate the valve with a blunt instrument (lolly pop stick works great)
If you have pressure a fast jet of gas will be expelled and the system should work great again with a service/re-gas, if not then nothing will happen and your issue is greater than a service. make sure to keep body/skin out of harms way of escaping gas and be very quick as it will be clear if the system is pressurised
A few things on this: the contents are really, really nasty so use eye protection if you try it. If you have no pressure, that certainly indicates the system has lost all of its gas. If that's the case, a pro will probably try to pull a vacuum on the system over 10-20 mins and see if there is a leak. If there's nothing obvious, they may suggest adding a UV dye plus nitrogen gas to see if the leak can be spotted and rectified. On the other hand, if it holds a vacuum, they'll go straight in with a re-gas.

Top leak suspects:

Condenser (the A/C radiator that sits in front of the engine cooling radiator: this is by far the most common. You can easily see it from the front, esp with the bonnet off: often they'll be visibility distorted or corroded.
O-rings: these can split. They are the green AC system rings, different from the various black standard ones you can find. Still cheap though.
Compressor seals: particularly on rarely used / serviced systems.
Pipe corrosion. When these systems go for long periods without servicing or perhaps just have the squirty top-ups, acid builds up and can corrode fitting from the inside out. This is one good reason for having regular services to the AC system.

If the above test reveals pressure, it might suggest that at least the system holds pressure: although it doesn't tell you how much. You'd only need 5 psi or so to be able to hear a hiss, but the system pressure might be 30Psi upwards. It might be that actually, as soon as you ask the system to take more, it starts to leak. Nevertheless, residual pressure is normally a good sign. It doesn't necessarily mean it'll work though: you might still have high or low pressure sensor faults, compressor clutch issue, external temperature sensor faulty / damaged / missing (esp in accident repaired cars).

For all that ... as I mentioned before, lots of people will refund you if the system can't be recharged so it's always worth giving it a go if nothing is obviously wrong.

Sorry, I know we said this thread would finish with the alternator, but I couldn't resist chiming in (again :rolleyes: )
 
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