Inlet Manifold Help

Chipper

Member
Wow, that was easy with your instructions. I don't know whether this is good new but all seems fine with the actuator, not broken and moves up and down with some resistance. At this stage I think that I am going to get everything reconnected and see how it goes. Tempted by Steve's offer of his inlet manifold, swap it out and then see what can be done with the existing one.
 

Andrew

A2OC Donor
Good news the the actuator does not appear broken but bear in mind it was only a partial test within the limited access available. It is also no guarantee the flaps are opening (shaft may have fractured or other) or opening fully (impeded by grime).

By all means reconnect the pipes but it will probably just revert to the problem state the previous owner encountered and tried to bodge.

You really want a mechanic with VCDS who knows what they are doing to check it out. My next step would be to check the function of the N316 valve (possible with VCDS I believe) and the potentiometer (with electrical meter?).

The only guaranteed route back to full health is to strip down, inspect, clean/replace, rebuild, but alas that will incur a lot of labour costs.

Report back as matters develop.

Andy
 

Chipper

Member
Wimped out at the last minute in case it was not drivable. I'm leaning towards just putting the cash towards fitting the used one from A2Steve. Would it be possible to check the N316 valve without reconnecting everything?

Jeff
 

Andrew

A2OC Donor
Just build up courage and take it to the garage, it should only take a few minutes to reconnect the small pipes on the N316 valve but having said that I still have no real idea how this bypass has been configured, it may be more complicated than I think. Yes, I am fairly confident the N316 can be tested with VCDS by somebody who knows what they are doing and I can't see how the car would be rendered undrivable, and on the remote chance it does this bypass bodge can be quickly reinstated. I can't see this taking long at all, maximum one hours labour.

Andy
 

Chipper

Member
What's stopping me is there there must have been something very wrong with the inlet manifold in order to go to the bother of by passing the actuator so I don't really want to pay out to reconnect it if I will have to replace/rebuild anyway. I'll have a chat with the mechanic on Friday to see if he can check the N316 as it is. Discovered a coolant leak while it was in there which is hopefully fixed - not exactly in the luck at the moment!!
 

Chipper

Member
Mmmm, it turns out I am missing the N316 valve and the actuator lines have essentially been connected as shown here in orange. I'm still trying to be charitible that the guy that sold it did not notice! Or the VW specialist that inspected it for me! It guess that is why it's a bit more expensive to reinstate it.

Picture1.png
 

Andrew

A2OC Donor
Feel duty bound to reply.

Interesting, not what I expected, almost clever. I am not an expert and I am struggling to understand the effect of bypassing the N316 valve and how the flaps will behave. Anybody? One thing is certain, the ECU can now no longer control the flaps, it will realise and run the engine in homogenous mode (and light the EML). This could have been achieved simply by unplugging the N316 electrical connector and not bothering with this deviousness. Sorry not much help and stating the obvious that it must all be put back to rights.

To this end on the positive side the cost of a new N316 valve (part number is 037906283D) is not that bad at £47, or used from £10 on eBay but I would not go there, but @A2Steve is currently recycling a FSI and I am sure he can provide any parts you need for a few pounds. It's only the size of a matchbox (+ electrical connector socket) and I believe Pierburg were the original Audi oem provider, and I recently recently bought this


You/your mechanic will also need two M5 x 16 mm pan head bolts to attach the valve to the manifold, such as this


[Does not have to be stainless]

You have not said if the small rubber tubing that attach to the valve are still present, if not you will have to source these, part numbers 036133784K and 036133784J, or make your own. I just hope the electrical is just dangling somewhere.

With the parts at hand I cannot see it taking very long to reinstall the valve say 1 hour labour max.

Slight note of pessimism but as I said before unless a faulty valve was the original problem leading to the bodge then this in itself may not clear the flap fault, but certainly part of the solution if not.

Hope this helps.

Andy
 

Chipper

Member
Thanks Andy,

You should not feel duty bound to reply but your input is very welcome and useful. I have already been in touch with @A2Steve but he needed the part numbers which you have supplied (Thank-you). I also now have the number of a mechanic close by who is reported to be familiar with this situation.

With the coolant leak fixed I gave the car a good run today and it's actually driving very well as it is, putting an A2 grin on my face, even though EML is on!

Down side is a went to see another A2 which I like even more than mine but I am guessing that mine is pretty worthless in it's current state.

Jeff
 

Chipper

Member
Firstly huge thanks to @Jellybean for putting me in touch with RSAutotechnik, they seem to really know their way around the FSI.

I have now learned .... All the pipework is in place and the flaps/diaphram can be actuated by the VCDS. They are suggesting that the problem appears to be with the angle of the flaps in the rest position and have proposed a "Forte" clean of the inlet manifold rather than stripping it all down. Can anyone offer a opinion on this approach. It's aout half the cost of swapping the manifold but I'm still tempted to swap it out.

Thanks, Jeff
 

Jellybean

Admin Team
Firstly huge thanks to @Jellybean for putting me in touch with RSAutotechnik, they seem to really know their way around the FSI.

I have now learned .... All the pipework is in place and the flaps/diaphram can be actuated by the VCDS. They are suggesting that the problem appears to be with the angle of the flaps in the rest position and have proposed a "Forte" clean of the inlet manifold rather than stripping it all down. Can anyone offer a opinion on this approach. It's aout half the cost of swapping the manifold but I'm still tempted to swap it out.

Thanks, Jeff
Jeff, the Forte solution may or may not work! Dismantling gives a guaranteed solution! Guess its a calculated risk.
The thing is with any flushing of the intake, whilst in situ, that any debris goes through the cylinders, which is not ideal.

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
 

A2 Louis

A2OC Donor
I agree with @Jellybean

if I was you I’d definitely take the lower intake manifold off and give it a clean it’s a guaranteed solution and also you don’t have to change the fuel filter after putting that horrible fluid through your engine

I’d never put any injector cleaner or carbon cleaner through my engine I’d just take them out and clean them manually at least you know it’s really clean and you don’t have to worry about it for a extra 50k miles :)

Definitely take the intake manifold off:)
 

A2Steve

A2OC Donor
Thanks for the advice @Jellybean @A2 Louis. Is the flaps off angle in the rest position associated with needing a clean.

As A2Steve has an inlet manifold available I was planning to swap it our and then clean up the old one (at some point) and put it up for sale.
I've seen all sorts of damage on inlet manifolds, from heavily dirty ones right through bent flaps to some where the flap is missing completely. Its all a bit of an unknown. perhaps you could get them to remove it and inspect it. I could get the replacement part to you next day with enough warning, so you could see whether yours could be repaired and if not then buy my good one to have fitted.
 

A2 Louis

A2OC Donor
Thanks for the advice @Jellybean @A2 Louis. Is the flaps off angle in the rest position associated with needing a clean.

As A2Steve has an inlet manifold available I was planning to swap it our and then clean up the old one (at some point) and put it up for sale.
Hi Bud if you buy Steve’s intake manifold I’ll happily buy yours off you even if the actuator arm is broken as I can get it fixed and I can use it for my other upcoming FSI projects :)
 

Andrew

A2OC Donor
Pleased to hear you have made a lot of progress with putting the inlet manifold to rights.

My vote is also strip down inspect/clean, even though this will incur some non trivial labour costs. These power cleaning aerosols/machines seem to me more a service item to perk up the cleanliness of an already healthy engine, not thick encrusted carbon preventing function that you probably have.

Buy Steve's manifold and have it cleaned before the car goes in ready to swap in without any delay.

Andy
 
Top