Jacking point pads, for trolley jack usage (questions)

TomA2TomAh2

A2OC Donor
So, at home I prefer to use a trolley jack to raise cars skyward. With a "new" car I like to put my mind at ease by doing a bit of research first and I found a very useful image which shows where the lift points are, and where to put axle stands, so thank you @Skipton01.

Normally I would put a block of wood between the chassis lift point and jack, to spread the weight and add some protection, but with the A2's aluminium underbody I wondered if this is a good idea? Are the rubber "hockey puck" shaped jack adapters a better idea?

To throw a spanner in the works, just last night I stumbled upon a YouTube video showing what look like to be these Audi TT jacking pad adapters being fitted to the A2 underbody lift points. Does any one have experience of these adapters? Are they a good or bad idea? Will they prevent the car being put on a 2/4 post lift at a later date?

And input appreciated, thanks!
Tom.
 

RobTT

Member
Was wondering this myself as looking at getting a trolley jack to use when taking wheels off for cleaning...
 

Evripidis

Member
Just something that I noticed recently that might be of help . While working on the rear, I found out that in order to get the rear on axle stands it is a good idea to remove the handbrake cable retainers first and then jack it up. The reason is that; the exact point where the retainers are is a strong point -right next to the bushing mount- thus you will not risk bending the torsion beam if you put the stands further in.
 

yarmon1

Member
Just something that I noticed recently that might be of help . While working on the rear, I found out that in order to get the rear on axle stands it is a good idea to remove the handbrake cable retainers first and then jack it up. The reason is that; the exact point where the retainers are is a strong point -right next to the bushing mount- thus you will not risk bending the torsion beam if you put the stands further in.
Hello, after reading the issue where ecurb had his A2 written off by National tyres during a tyre change I found that other A2 owners had identified that other car manufacturers’ use a similar jacking method in the sill, so I went to a local fabrication shop and had two made, I think it would be useful to jack the car with a trolley jack and then find a suitable jacking point identified in the image by Skipton01 for an axle stand. The white plastic is a thermoplastic to mimic the correct depth to insert into the sill based on the A2 car jack. I think when I have tyres fitted I would insist they use this to jack the car to prevent tyre fitters jacking the trolley jack into the aluminium chassis.
 

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yarmon1

Member
One final point on my experience of jacking pads I have a Mk1 TT which is lowered and difficult to get a normal jack underneath so looking on the forums other owners identified the round rubber pad and tried using it with a trolley jack. However it was reported that the chassis would cave in slightly apparently they are designed to like the car but with a two or four post lift so the weight is evenly distributed across the pads. I know the TT is much heavier so maybe this does not apply to the A2 but due to the aluminium chassis I would rather using the sill method.
 

Rogan

Member
Hello, after reading the issue where ecurb had his A2 written off by National tyres during a tyre change I found that other A2 owners had identified that other car manufacturers’ use a similar jacking method in the sill, so I went to a local fabrication shop and had two made, I think it would be useful to jack the car with a trolley jack and then find a suitable jacking point identified in the image by Skipton01 for an axle stand. The white plastic is a thermoplastic to mimic the correct depth to insert into the sill based on the A2 car jack. I think when I have tyres fitted I would insist they use this to jack the car to prevent tyre fitters jacking the trolley jack into the aluminium chassis.
It's pretty dicey jacking in the jack point with a trolley jack. First problem is one if leverage, you want to be as close as humanly possible to the sill to reduce the force encountered at the jacking tube. Second problem is one of impetus/impulse, you literally cannot jerk the vehicle with the supplied screwjack, you absolutely can with a floor jack.

Combined you end up separating the weak aluminium spot welds that hold the jacking tube in place on the sill, and you are effectively effed until you tig it back together. It can absolutely be done, slowly and carefully, just don't get extreporous with it.
 

Evripidis

Member
I always use the factory jack on all the cars that I service. I consider it too risky to use the trolley jack if I am honest!
 

Rusty911

A2OC Donor
I always use the factory jack on all the cars that I service. I consider it too risky to use the trolley jack if I am honest!
Respectfully, the supplied jack is lightweight, temporary and unstable. It is designed purely to get you out of trouble. It has no inherent stability at all and relies on the car not being able to move around it.

If you don't trust your trolley jack, get a better trolley jack. Ideally a solid semi-commercial 2 ton model with plenty of lift. I don't mean these little 'my first trolley jack with realistic lifting action, complete with plastic lunchbox / case', but an old school heavy duty jack. They're an excellent investment and I still regularly use the Sealey one I bought when I was 18. That was in the late 80's! I've got a modern Sealey equivalent which I think was about £130-£140 which isn't as well made (still hugely better than the DIY ones), but in real terms was cheaper than the '80's one.

A good trolley jack might just save your life one day. If it doesn't, at least it won't cost you it. Pro-tip: always leave the handle in your trolley jack if you can and leave it done up, ready to use. This is even if you've swapped over to stands.

If someone finds you trapped under a car, or they rush around because someone else is trapped, the jack's ready to go and they don't really have to know how to use it: odds are they'll figure out how to make it go up. They might not know to twist it closed before jacking. You may not be in a position to tell them what to do. I can think of little worse than for a bystander not being able to help in such an emergency.
 
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philward

A2OC Donor
I don't understand the concern, lifted my A2 on a trolly jack from new, I just use a rubber or wooden pad. Safest way to lift it and new jacks come fitted with rubber pads.

I never let a garage near my car unless they are 100% about how and where to lift it. Audi lifted and bent my first A2, replaced at their cost. The replacement would have been damaged by an accident repair centre if I hadn't insisted on being present at the inspection.
 

Un4tural

Member
Reminded me this - bought a rubber puck thing for my A2, has a slit as well for jacking new to us A4 as well and will save faffing about with my furniture pads from scratching the belly.

Wouldn't have thought a garage wouldn't know how to jack a car up though... Then again seen a few fiat 500s with bent skirts cause presumably some bonehead tried to jack them up by the skirt and not jacking point that is further in from the skirt...
 

TomA2TomAh2

A2OC Donor
Since I started this thread (then forgot about it...) here's my two penneth:

I bought one of those little rubber "puck" things from eBay that fits in the saddle of my trolley jack, that has a second "puck" attached to it that happens to nestle perfectly inside the "teeth" that surround the factory 4-poster lift points (indicated by yellow arrows in the the image linked in the first post) when the rubber bung is removed.

I raise the suspension with the factory jack then slide the trolley jack under and in to position and continue lifting with that. A low profile trolley jack would negate the need for the factory jack completely, but I work with what I have!

Doing it this way feels an extremely solid/safe way to lift the vehicle.
 

spike

Well-Known Member
I use the same 4 chassis lifting points but remove the large rubber bung at each station so my custom spigotted jack pad fits neatly in the locating hole. This makes for a really secure lift with no chance of anything slipping as the car is raised
The jack pad was turned from an old truck alternator pulley which I had in stock although I always intended to make one from aluminium bar to do justice to the A2's construction

Cheers Spike
 

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Howey

Member
I use the same 4 chassis lifting points but remove the large rubber bung at each station so my custom spigotted jack pad fits neatly in the locating hole. This makes for a really secure lift with no chance of anything slipping as the car is raised
The jack pad was turned from an old truck alternator pulley which I had in stock although I always intended to make one from aluminium bar to do justice to the A2's construction

Cheers Spike
So do you remove the rubber grommit in order for the above engineering excellence to fit snug?
 

audifan

A2OC Donor
And for those of us with the votex side skirts, try raising your car with the factory jack. Not a chance. That is where my trolley jack comes into its own. The jacking point covers have been glued on with silicone for a long time.
 
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