Lower chain and chain tensioner replacements for the TDI

philward

A2OC Donor
Phil the transition sleeve should be the same diameter as the crank sealing diameter - any bigger and you risk stretching the seal or damaging the very delicate lip. If you look at fig 4 in that SKF link I posted earlier you can see the sleeve is just to get the seal to slide over the step in the shaft easily - it doesn't fit over the shaft sealing diameter. I suspect the yogurt pot is too big a diameter and has over stretched the seal.

Simon.
I agree the seal is definitely over deformed, certainly in one direction. Measurements are shaft OD 35 mm (polished and burr free) yogurt pot OD 36 mm. That pot would have transitioned a rubber seal over the pulley drive / location slot perfectly. However as I have now found out PTFE behaves very differently.
Seal dimensions, large OD 35 mm, small OD 34.5. So The measurements agree, over stretched. But that could have been caused by the fitting or removal off square.

The first 10 mm of shaft is OD 34 mm with a step up that will catch a seal lip. I suspect the job specific transition sleeve will fit the shaft past this lip making its OD larger than the shaft OD of 35 mm. I will report with measurements.

One thing I am certain of is that you should not mess with this seal unless you have to. I suspect if you work from under the car, and with the sump off, the seal housing will pull off square. Refit it nice and square and I suspect the original seal would slide back into place. Job done.

Unfortunately I made my decisions based on past experiences with rubber seals.
 

philward

A2OC Donor
I now have seal fitting tool T10053. The O/D of the transition sleeve is 35.2 mm, I/D 34 mm so perhaps as Simon suggested the sleeve just slips over the first portion of the shaft? I will see and report.

One thing is for certain, the yogurt pot and pre-fitting the seal to the seal housing was never going to work with PTFE seals.
 

sco

A2OC Donor
Halleluya! Write up would be good - planning timing chain inspection / replacement myself in a month or so's time!

Simon.
 

philward

A2OC Donor
Driven the car very locally today. It really cracks on so I appear to have improved something. Very surprisingly responsive.

Still have two problems:

A monster oil leak up the rear / RH side of engine. The only option I now have is to clean up and lay under there looking for the leak. I'd rather not, any suggestions? Cam cover and fuel pump fine.

As the revs rise a belt or something starts to whistle. All tensions are to the manual so I'm thinking screwdriver on auxiliary bearings. any other suggestions? Just drive it?
 

sco

A2OC Donor
Could the whistle be a boost leak or is it definitely rev related rather than boost?

If it's not the cam cover, oil leak from the rear of the engine must be feed pipe to the turbo no?

Simon.
 

philward

A2OC Donor
OK I’m new to diesel maintenance. I have the back end on the ramps for tomorrow. Will turn it arround once finished at the rear and check.
Thanks for the advice.
 

depronman

A2OC Donor
Started it just now. Got it warm, gave it some revs.

Nice and dry :D

If I were to find time to write this up without all the delays and errors would that be useful?
That must have been a nice relief when you got the seal to seal correctly

I might well be following you on this path in a few months time, would be you willing to loan out the special tools on a deposit basis ?

+1 for the full right up

Cheers,
Paul
 

philward

A2OC Donor
That must have been a nice relief when you got the seal to seal correctly

Cheers,
Paul
I had taken so many knocks from that seal I didn’t believe it had worked. I cleaned up and ran the car and found tiny traces of oil. I cleaned and ran three times before I was convinced the oil was from the rear of the cam and water pump pulleys and originated from an earlier failure.
 

sco

A2OC Donor
That must have been a nice relief when you got the seal to seal correctly

I might well be following you on this path in a few months time, would be you willing to loan out the special tools on a deposit basis ?

+1 for the full right up

Cheers,
Paul
Just what I was going to ask!

Simon.
 

philward

A2OC Donor
Oh how things used to be; so looking forward to working on the Golf again:



(Source Haynes Publishing Group, ISBN 1 85010 523 5)

Drove the A2 to the shops today, so much improved but so much still wrong, or should that be different????
 

philward

A2OC Donor
Could the whistle be a boost leak or is it definitely rev related rather than boost?

If it's not the cam cover, oil leak from the rear of the engine must be feed pipe to the turbo no?

Simon.
Definitely rev related, going to start investigating today. First I will remove the auxiliary belt and see if the problem goes away.

Turbo looks reasonably dry.

Or the oil return to the block?

RAB
The leak looks like it is above the exhaust manifold towards the rear of the engine. What I cant be sure of at the moment is if the oil has been sprayed there by the drive shaft. The leak is definitely somewhere between the inboard CV joint and the top of the engine roughly in line with No 3 exhaust manifold outlet.

Edit: This oil leak deserves a thread of its own. Never seen anything like it https://www.a2oc.net/community/index.php?threads/help-weirdest-oil-leak-i-have-ever-seen.35559/
 
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philward

A2OC Donor
Belt noise.

Removed the auxiliary no change so it's the timing belt. Checked timing belt tension pulley; looks absolutely fine. Backed the tension off a little; slight change in belt noise. Restored tension and checked by pulling / twisting belt; certainly no tighter than the belt that came off.

Conclusion; drive it job done.
 

longdog

Member
Having read Sarge's excellent piece on the subject https://www.a2oc.net/community/index.php?threads/general-a2-servicing-information.23606/page-2#post-267826 I asked my totally honest garage owner for a quote for replacing the oil pump chain, tensioner, etc on my tdi75 and met with some ridicule: 'never known one to fail....big and expensive job to replace....in the very unlikely event of a failure you could get a lower mileage replacement engine for less' and so on. But like some other contributors to this thread I would like peace of mind for long journeys.
The car has done 152K miles and I assume it hasn't had the chain replaced. The last owner took good care but I have no means of knowing what went before. I can hear no rattle in the engine at all.
I would be very grateful for members' views on how many AMF engines are running happily at 150-200K miles without having had the chain replaced, and also on whether one could hope to get warning of impending failure. Is there usually a rattle or increased vibration, for instance?
 
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