Question Where do that mouse get into my car??

dieselfan

Member
One thing is that she use my beloved car as her toilet...
Lucily no sign of "bite marks" thoug I am very conserned wrt cabels...

Any idea where she enter???
 
One thing is that she use my beloved car as her toilet...
Lucily no sign of "bite marks" thoug I am very conserned wrt cabels...

Any idea where she enter???
We have lost 2 fuel tanks on the Audi a2s over the years it’s been said rodents like the smell of diesel the tanks were both chewed on the top of tanks were pipes connect ..I have poison bait boxes and rat traps around the property ..but this time of year they are all looking for somewhere dry and warm also lost an engine black felt cover ..with a mouse nest in there .🤬
 

terrywindy1

A2OC Donor
Have a problem with Field mice all my cars,
mainly in the engine bay, so every few weeks I sprinkle drops of Peppermint oil around the engine bay like the Pope blessing my engine.
It diffinatly seems to work,apparently mice don't like the smell.And smells OK when you turn on heater fan,and now I always have too keep a packet of mints in the Car
20201120_183354.jpg
 
Have a problem with Field mice all my cars,
mainly in the engine bay, so every few weeks I sprinkle drops of Peppermint oil around the engine bay like the Pope blessing my engine.
It diffinatly seems to work,apparently mice don't like the smell.And smells OK when you turn on heater fan,and now I always have too keep a packet of mints in the CarView attachment 73296
I will try that terry ..I hope it’s better than A recommendation I was given years ago mothballs down mole hills To put the critters off coming in our garden I bought up load and duly stuffed them down all I could see next day was like some one had use the grassy area for a golf practise ..white Moth ball yes 😱..they turffed them out .,I know use a tunnel type trap Caught 7 last year before long will have enough for a fur coat .,joke for all you animal lovers..🥳
 

RZX

Member
The answer is mothballs, they don't like the smell, it's what farmers use when they park up their combine harvesters.
Not a pleasant smell but ideal if you are parking a car up for a while, it's worked for us after the little sods got into my nearly new car and ate the seat belt.
 

terrywindy1

A2OC Donor
I will try that terry ..I hope it’s better than A recommendation I was given years ago mothballs down mole hills To put the critters off coming in our garden I bought up load and duly stuffed them down all I could see next day was like some one had use the grassy area for a golf practise ..white Moth ball yes 😱..they turffed them out .,I know use a tunnel type trap Caught 7 last year before long will have enough for a fur coat .,joke for all you animal lovers..🥳
I had a mole in my vegetable garden back in July,I was working in the garden and I could see the soil moving, so I start jumping up and down on the area in my Wellies just then my wife comes around the corner to see me doing a John Cleese impersonation
 
I had a mole in my vegetable garden back in July,I was working in the garden and I could see the soil moving, so I start jumping up and down on the area in my Wellies just then my wife comes around the corner to see me doing a John Cleese impersonation
I’ve just ordered 100mm of that peppermint oil £7.99 e bay so will give it a try thanks terry 👍
 

dieselfan

Member
Many thanks for all the good advice's and good stories 👍 ;) ;) but where is the gap /slit this mouse use to get in ???

Google tell me that it will have to be 5/16" (8mm) wide to let a noggy mouse to pass....
 

PlasticMac

Member
It will only be able to squeeze its self through a gap if the gap is bigger than its skull
First catch your mouse.
Next, measure it's skull (care must be taken so the mouse is not stressed in any way). Repeat several times, using a different mouse each time. To ensure the same mouse is not measured twice (which would invalidate the survey result), the mouse should be marked using a mouse friendly marker pen, prior to release.
Using the average skull size of at least ten mice (to ensure the survey is statistically representative of the local mouse population), calculate the average skull size, to at least one decimal place.
Now, cut a piece of non abrasive material, of circular cross section, the circumference of which should be equal to the average skull size calculated above. This will be used as a MAD (Mouse Access Detector).
Now check all shut lines, cable entries, and similar using the MAD.
Using a MIF (Mouse Impervious Filler) block all PMAPs (Potential Mouse Access Points).
Note: The use of a MAD of average mouse skull size will ensure a few younger mice will be able to access a food source, and so ensure local bio diversity is not compromised.
MAC (Mouse Affiliation Committee).
 
When we lived in NZ we had a problem - Barbara opened the glove compartment one morning and there he was - Mr Rat himself!
 

Erlingtheelder

A2OC Donor
First catch your mouse.
Next, measure it's skull (care must be taken so the mouse is not stressed in any way). Repeat several times, using a different mouse each time. To ensure the same mouse is not measured twice (which would invalidate the survey result), the mouse should be marked using a mouse friendly marker pen, prior to release.
Using the average skull size of at least ten mice (to ensure the survey is statistically representative of the local mouse population), calculate the average skull size, to at least one decimal place.
Now, cut a piece of non abrasive material, of circular cross section, the circumference of which should be equal to the average skull size calculated above. This will be used as a MAD (Mouse Access Detector).
Now check all shut lines, cable entries, and similar using the MAD.
Using a MIF (Mouse Impervious Filler) block all PMAPs (Potential Mouse Access Points).
Note: The use of a MAD of average mouse skull size will ensure a few younger mice will be able to access a food source, and so ensure local bio diversity is not compromised.
MAC (Mouse Affiliation Committee).
Would it be considered poor form to keep an underfed cat In the engine bay? Obviously only when parked up. I’m not proposing while the car is in motion.
 

Sootywg

A2OC Donor
I had a family of mice nest in the air filter of the ventilation system of my A4 Cab, The first I knew about it was when the air blower fan started making a dreadful ’out of balance’ type whirring noise!
Yep you guessed it baby mice had fallen into the large peripheral fan.
Given that:
1) the mice are attracted to the engine compartment (nice and warm perhaps)
2) the only thing we deliberately let into the car is air for ventilation.
The natural route for the mice is via the air ventilation ducts. The main obstruction being the filter, once past there the ducts present no problem, can the get past the flaps and vent louvred? Probably.
 

Erlingtheelder

A2OC Donor
Regret to advise engine air intake through to filter body is another favoured entry point - to the amusement and amazement of Audi Stafford mechanic carrying out a Cam belt change and intermediate Long Life service on my 1.2 TDi. Mouse had eaten through quite a bit of the filter element and made a lovely sleeping place, full of nest material and fur. The mouse had long since left ‘home’ with its little ones - leaving a completely unfiltered air supply to the engine’s turbo system. No repeat incidents have been found, but not surprising give my namesakes earlier suggestion!!
 
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