Swedish A2 1.2tdi running on biodiesel

Alan_uk

A2OC Donor
Swedish A2 1.2tdi running on 2nd generation HVO biodiesel

Just come across this Youtube video www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVkGXan7s7Q from 2 May 16

This clip is about [second generation] HVO-biodiesel and how it runs on the car. I think it's a great biofuel and I think it will become pretty popular. One of the most important facts is that it works down to -34 degrees celsius, making it practical to use during the winter also.
In the video he says it is made from vegetable waste and he is getting 94mpg (google conversion from 3l/100km). It's a 1.2tdi A2 from 2001 with 280,000 km (175,000 m).

Looking at some earlier forum threads on biodiesel there has been mixed feelings about its long term effect on engines, but then much biodiesel is made from waste cooking oil.
 
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chubbybrown

Member
Its the Injector seals, thats how its normally done with a twin tank system to purge the system back to straight diesel when the car is sat.
 
I have ben running all my diesel cars on 2nd gen diesel for the last 2 years. An 07 Range Rover TDV8 has covered 70.000km using this fuel. Also a 01 MB E320cdi (sold) has covered about 10000km. Now my newly acquired 02 A2 1.2 TDi are also running on 2nd gen diesel. I would never fill traditional Biodiesel (FAME).

2nd gen diesel is basically the same as HVO what the engine concerns as both are extremely clean but the production method and what it is made from differs. 2nd gen is produced using GTL (gas to liquid) process from anything containing Carbon while HVO is produced by Hydrotreating oils and fat.

Local pollution is reduced and it is also almost CO2 neutral but the question for the future is if our land is going to produce food of fuel...
 

Alan_uk

A2OC Donor
but the question for the future is if our land is going to produce food of fuel...
Good question. Burning waste (or products made from waste) is good but in the UK there are examples of power stations importing wood pellets from USA and getting a green subsidy. Hardly a sustainable solution.
 
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